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Lidia Bastianich is an Emmy award-winning television host, best-selling cookbook author, and restaurateur. She has held true to her Italian roots and culture, which she proudly and warmly invites her fans to experience.
 
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Toasted Bread in Savory Spinach Sauce
This dish is also very good when made with Swis...
 
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Behind the scenes in Lidia's Kitchen

 
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Learn a little Italian!
Even if your Italian vocabulary is limited to food and profanity, you have probably heard the suffix ...
 
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Sailing the Adriatic
Each summer, Lidia joins a small group of friends for a sailing trip and a week of swimming, relaxation and of course delicious...
 
Lidia heading to Napa Valley
Lidia visits Napa Valley to enjoy the annual Festival del Sole and a tribute to Sophia Loren at Far...
 
Oxford Symposium on Food and Cookery 2014 !
Lidia returns to the Oxford Symposium on Food and Cookery this weekend."This international conference on food, attended by...
 
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Food Books and Dvds Tableware

Lidia's Commonsense Italian Cooking
Lidia brings viewers on a road trip into the heart of Italian-American cooking.
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LIDIA'S
Enjoy Lidia's pastas and sauces!
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Lidia's Stoneware Collection

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October 26, 2014
Learn a little Italian!

Even if your Italian vocabulary is limited to food and profanity, you have probably heard the suffix “-ino” or “-ina” tacked onto the end of various Italian words. These are the masculine and feminine diminutive word endings. For example, if “sorella” means “sister,” “sorellina” means “little sister,” and a “biscottino” refers to a little cookie. On the other hand, the suffix “–one” (pronounced “oh-nay”) means “big,” so if a “bacio” is a kiss, a “bacione” would be a big kiss!