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Lidia Bastianich is an Emmy award-winning television host, best-selling cookbook author, and restaurateur. She has held true to her Italian roots and culture, which she proudly and warmly invites her fans to experience.
 
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Arugula and White-Bean Salad
You don't have to use cannellini beans. Kidney ...
 
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Behind the scenes in Lidia's Kitchen

 
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Pinoli
Pinoli nuts (often spelled pignoli in English) are the edible seeds inside certain species of pinecone...
 
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Milano
So excited as I begin filming another season of Junior MasterChef Italia over the next few weeks. Stay tuned for more info this...
 
Lidia in Friuli
Lidia is heading to Friuli to spend some quality time with family and friends."   ...
 
Sailing the Adriatic
Each summer, Lidia joins a small group of friends for a sailing trip and a week of swimming, relaxation and of course delicious...
 
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Food Books and Dvds Tableware

Lidia's Commonsense Italian Cooking
Lidia brings viewers on a road trip into the heart of Italian-American cooking.
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LIDIA'S
Enjoy Lidia's pastas and sauces!
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Lidia's Stoneware Collection

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October 23, 2014
Pinoli

Pinoli nuts (often spelled pignoli in English) are the edible seeds inside certain species of pinecones. Once the nut is removed from the cone, the shell is cracked to reveal a soft, ivory colored nut. When mature, the pinecone releases the pine nuts naturally but sometimes has to be heated to remove all the nuts; and this labor-intensive process is what makes pinoli so expensive. These nuts have become so popular over time that their trees are a resource in danger of depletion because so few seeds are left for reproduction, and each tree needs quite a few years to mature and produce the pine cones that hold pinoli. In Italian cuisine, pinoli are most often used in pesto, baking, and in savory dishes, especially in Sicily where pine nuts are often paired with raisins and used in fish and vegetable preparations. In the Italian American tradition, pinoli call to mind the soft almond cookies covered in pine nuts. After purchasing pinoli, keep in mind that they turn rancid quickly and should be stored in an air tight plastic bag in the refrigerator for up to 3 months. If you freeze your pine nuts, they are good for up to 9 months.