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Lidia Bastianich is an Emmy award-winning television host, best-selling cookbook author, and restaurateur. She has held true to her Italian roots and culture, which she proudly and warmly invites her fans to experience.
 
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Turkey Tetrazzini
What to do with the leftover turkey after Thank...
 
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Lidias Common Sense Cooking: Finding Fresh Eggs

 
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Mostarde
Mostarde, a condiment made of candied fruits and mustard flavored syrup, have been part of the Italian...
 
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The Splendid Table
Lidia will be joining Lynne Rossetto on Turkey Confidential this Thanksgiving for their" annual live, call in show from...
 
Lidia in Chicago
Lidia will be in Chicago this week visiting her Public Television friends at WTTW, conducting a class at Eataly Chicgao " and...
 
NY Moves Power Women Event 2014
Lidia will be honored at the NY Moves Power Women Event on Friday November 14. This is a wonderful event honoring influential...
 
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Food Books and Dvds Tableware

Lidia's Commonsense Italian Cooking
Lidia brings viewers on a road trip into the heart of Italian-American cooking.
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LIDIA'S
Enjoy Lidia's pastas and sauces!
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Lidia's Stoneware Collection

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March 22, 2014
Mostarde

Mostarde, a condiment made of candied fruits and mustard flavored syrup, have been part of the Italian culinary repertoire for centuries, originally as a way of preserving vegetables and fruits-such as squash, apples, and pears-for the winter months. Cooked in sweet syrup with hot mustard added, mostarde were enjoyed as a crisp and fresh-tasting condiment when there was no fresh produce. The epicenter of the Italian mostarda culture is in and around Modena, but every region of Italy has some form of it. It is a great condiment for boiled meats, or grilled or poached poultry. I love it served with celery and a good ripe cheese as well as with fresh sheep’s-milk ricotta. And, suspended in its sweet syrup, it is also delicious on ice cream! It keeps in the refrigerator for months.